Mandelbrot Zooms: If you magnified a hydrogen atom to the size of the observable Universe, that would be a magnification of about 1036. Some of these zooms go way way way beyond that…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image gallery of a zoom sequence (wikipedia)

The Mandelbrot set shows more intricate detail the closer one looks or magnifies the image, usually called “zooming in”. The following example of an image sequence zooming to a selected c value gives an impression of the infinite richness of different geometrical structures, and explains some of their typical rules.

The magnification of the last image relative to the first one is about 10,000,000,000 to 1. Relating to an ordinary monitor, it represents a section of a Mandelbrot set with a diameter of 4 million kilometres. Its border would show an astronomical number of different fractal structures.

The seahorse “body” is composed by 25 “spokes” consisting of two groups of 12 “spokes” each and one “spoke” connecting to the main cardioid. These two groups can be attributed by some kind of metamorphosis to the two “fingers” of the “upper hand” of the Mandelbrot set; therefore, the number of “spokes” increases from one “seahorse” to the next by 2; the “hub” is a so-called Misiurewicz point. Between the “upper part of the body” and the “tail” a distorted small copy of the Mandelbrot set called satellite may be recognized.

The islands above seem to consist of infinitely many parts like Cantor sets, as is actually the case for the corresponding Julia set Jc. However they are connected by tiny structures so that the whole represents a simply connected set. The tiny structures meet each other at a satellite in the center that is too small to be recognized at this magnification. The value of c for the corresponding Jc is not that of the image center but, relative to the main body of the Mandelbrot set, has the same position as the center of this image relative to the satellite shown in the 6th zoom step.

 

One thought on “Mandelbrot Zooms

Leave a Reply